The railway strike of 1947 1948 in ousmane sembnes novel gods bits of wood

In a circular of October 8, strike committee members rejected picketing, plant takeovers, or any other tactics that would give the impression of sabotage and lawlessness.

A riot ensues, in which eight are killed and many more injured. Distressed by the apparent erosion of traditional relations between adults and youths, and disturbed by her own memories of an unsuccessful strike, Niakoro believes union members should not strike without first consulting the elders in the community.

God’s Bits of Wood

The psychological hardships of the strike transform not only the union members but also their families. The plan was for the cadre unique to grant African workers all of the benefits—except hardship pay—that European employees already enjoyed.

The railroad union members also won a 20 percent increase in wages and benefits. The timing was strategic—the strike coincided with the visit to Senegal of colonial dignitaries. There are those who do it because they are forced to — Alioune, Deune, Idrissa and myself all prostitute our work and our abilities to men who have no respect for us.

Some female characters, ever distrustful of innovation, are content with their roles in traditional African culture. The decree led to the raising of freight rates and the firing of a substantial number of railroad workers.

Like the civil servants in the general strike ofits railroad workers called for a single-staff system and job security for the so-called temporary workers.

They die brutally, they die tragically, they give their lives just before the triumph of their efforts and lose their lives soon afterwards.

Led by Penda, the women make their way across the rugged, drought-parched countryside; villages between Thies and Dakar turn out to support the women on their march, providing them with food, water, and shelter when they stop to rest. If a man like that is killed, there is always another to take his place.

Speaking in Bambara and French, Bakayoko summarizes African grievances under colonialism; he concludes by advocating a general strike, an appeal that is taken up by the workers in attendance. Quarrels are cut short, however, when a troop of soldiers arrives and attacks the assembled strikers.

Many Africans embraced the doctrine, demanding more assimilation than France was willing to grant. The whole community finds itself preoccupied by the possible ramifications of such a decision, including the family of Ibrahim Bakayoko, an influential African labor activist traveling throughout nearby Senegal to muster support for the strike.

God's Bits of Wood Questions and Answers

As dawn approaches, the tense railroad workers argue among themselves about the merits of the strike, some accusing others of cowardice and collaboration with the French-owned railroad company.

He seeks her help with the distribution of rations to the women and with other union-related matters. Towards the end of the meeting, Bakayoko seizes his own chance to address the crowd.

Out of a combined total of almost 20, rail, wharf, and shipyard workers of which 17, worked for the railroadsonly 38 African and expatriate French employees were on the job on November 1, The marching women brandish pro-labor banners in full view of colonial officials in Dakar, revealing a more sophisticated understanding of the struggle than they may have previously possessed.

The protest itself grew out of economic and social changes that took place in the years during and after World War II. Seeking to eliminate pervasive workplace discrimination, the participants in the Dakar general strike of —which lasted about a week in December —called for the creation of a cadre unique single-staff system.

Conceding that the conflict has gotten out of control, Ramatoulaye goes to the police station. A ten-day general strike promptly ensues, after which both sides return to the bargaining table.

God's Bits of Wood Summary

By contrast, other women, subjected to the same strike-related deprivations as the men, undergo a psychological metamorphosis, abandoning traditional roles and customs as they strive to provide for their families.God's Bits of Wood is a novel by Ousmane Sembene based on the real-life events involved in the Senegalese railway workers' strike in The setting stretches from Senegal to Mali, and the story.

Sembene Ousmane's novel, "Gods Bits of Wood," gives a highly detailed story of the railway strike of in French West Africa. It contains conflicts of political, emotional and moral nature. Ultimately, Sembene's novel is one of empowerment. - Sembene Ousmane’s novel, “Gods Bits of Wood,” gives a highly detailed story of the railway strike of in French West Africa.

It contains conflicts of political, emotional and moral nature. In God’s Bits of Wood, the Dakar-Niger Railway strike and its effect dominate the lives of Sembène’s characters. The protest itself grew out of economic and social changes that took place in the years during and after World War II.

Sembene Ousmane's novel, "Gods Bits of Wood," gives a highly detailed story of the railway strike of in French West Africa.

God's Bits of Wood

It contains conflicts of political, emotional and moral nature. It contains conflicts of political, emotional and moral nature. The –8 Dakar-Niger railway strike is known as one of the events that have truly shaped the importance of African culture.

God’s Bits of Wood is a fictional piece based on the events that took place in the strike and never ceases to shock, inspire and most importantly, shed light on the events that took place/5.

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The railway strike of 1947 1948 in ousmane sembnes novel gods bits of wood
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